Biodiversity, Ecological and Environmental Biological Research

Biodiversity, ecology and environmental biology are important research areas that involve a significant portion of our current biology faculty. Biodiversity and ecological research is widely recognized as vital to society and modern biology. Knowledge of biodiversity, understanding the role(s) of the biota in our environment and the impacts of the environment on them are essential research goals of this area. Many innovative research projects are underway on various aspects of biodiversity from evolutionary and environmental perspectives. Molecular phylogenetics is increasingly important in biodiversity and ecological research. Aquatic ecosystems, both fresh water and marine, are a focus of a number of investigators in the Aquatic Research Group. Terrestrial ecological research, spanning protests, fungi, algae, plants and animals also has major significance. Conceptual and fundamental biological principles and concepts are common to both terrestrial and aquatic ecological research. The broad contingent of highly talented biodiversity and ecological researchers are a vital component of the department.

These people are involved in this research area:

Important Date

June 4 – June 8: Convocation Ceremony (Fort Garry Campus)

Upcoming Seminars

General seminar: Haoran Chen, PhD Proposal: “Nitrogen fixing plant evolution: the major factors affecting biological nitrogen fixation” — Friday, May 25 at 2 p.m., 304 Biological Sciences.

General seminar: Ashley Tripp, MSc. Defense: “Temperature and pCO2: single and combined effects of climate change parameters on acid-base regulation in Louisiana red swamp crayfish” — Monday, May 28 at 10 a.m., 304 Biological Sciences.

General seminar: Garett Allen, PhD Proposal: “Acid-base regulation in Stenohaline Osmoconforming Crustaceans” — Thursday, June 7 at 9 a.m., 201 BSB.

General seminar: Amber Hiebert, MSc. Defense: “Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) Myotome Development: The Proliferation of Satellite Cells in the Developing Sturgeon” — Tuesday, June 26 at 1 p.m., 304 Biological Sciences.